Sympathy for the Devil

Maria Bamford used to do a bit about a boyfriend who was “a musician, so you already know he’s sleazy.” Rock and rollers aren’t typically known as models of domestic stability, and of course, that’s part of their appeal in a lot of ways. Perhaps most impressively, Screaming Jay Hawkins apparently sired so many children that a data registry was set up for the sole purpose of tracking his offspring. (Hey, I didn’t say it was a positive accomplishment.)

A similar rock and roll sperm donor was Brian Jones, co-founder (and arguably the best musician) of the Rolling Stones. Unlike most of the band (whom Lemmy recalls as having worked to cultivate “an air of disrespectability”), Jones apparently was considered a genuine bad boy, and according to Allmusic, had several children while he was still in his teens.

Unsurprisingly, this behavior didn’t stop when he became a rock star. Of course, in the 1960s, there was considerably greater stigma attached to illegitimacy, and when Jones impregnated a woman named Dawn Molloy in 1964, she was paid £ 700 for her silence, and when she gave birth to a son in early 1965, the child was put up for adoption. His biological father was unnamed on his birth certificate, which identified him solely as a musician.

The child was adopted and grew up as John Maynard, and after fathering two children of his own, he researched his parentage. His story may be found here, and despite the fact that it’s in the Daily Mail, it’s worth checking out:

‘I met some people last summer and was invited on to their boat.

‘It turned out they were the biggest Stones fans, so I had to listen to Paint It Black and Sympathy For The Devil and so on, while they jigged around and talked about the Stones. I didn’t say a word. What’s the point? It’s almost as if I’m silenced too.’

Advertisements

About profmondo

Dad, husband, mostly free individual, medievalist, writer, and drummer. "Gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche."
This entry was posted in Music. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s